: 1, Waly waly up the bank 2, The ploughman laddie 3, Jack of all trades. Accueil. The same phrase can be found in the American "Peggy Gordon". In 1855 the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne "appointed a committee 'to protect and preserve the ancient melodies of Northumberland'". 19, ESTC T186186, available at ECCO). This is very similar to "No wings, and cannot fly so high" in Brown's text quoted above, to "Nor have I any wings to fly" (M. H. Henry, No. The melody of Bob Dylan's "Lay Down Your Weary Tune" sounds as if it is closely related to the one used for "The Water Is Wide". On his LP "The Wandering Folk Song" (1966, Folkways, On this LP Hinton also sings an "anti-liquor song"  called "Intemperance" - found in ", The two fragments Sharp secured from Elizabeth Mogg are relics of another broadside ballad called "I'm Often Drunk And Seldom Sober". Nor do we know if and how much Ramsay and Thomson have edited their texts. 1, 1909, pp. I leaned my back up against some oak It seems that especially the verses associated with "Oh Waly, Waly" and related songs have been very popular among the producers of broadsides. It was also adapted in North America for some other of songs. Frank Brown once noted that this song has "one of those Protean folk-lyrics whose identity is hard to fix because they shift from text to text, taking on new elements and dropping old ones from the general reservoir of the folk fancy" (Brown 1952, Vol. The unfortunate swain. The first verse of "The Water Is Wide" also shows an interesting development. Quite a lot of different imprints were used for the Evans family's publications but this particular one can be found on many song-sheets and some of them are even exactly dateable. 1857 online available at, "The Prickly Rose", from William Christie , Traditional Ballad Airs, Vol. The exact publication date is not clear. His voice was clear, full of emotion and youthful exuberance. Guy Carawan recorded it also in 1958 for Folkways (FW03544) and in his liner notes he wrote that Seeger had taught it to him while "driving along in a car in upstate New York". The album takes its name from a Bob Dylan song, and includes a total of four Dylan songs, ... And Nails", and "The Water Is Wide". Already in 1803 a fragmentary version consisting of only three verses but including a tune was published by James Johnson in the sixth volume of his Scots Musical Museum. Polished poetry in the text seems at times to be the work of a highly gifted poet, but actually has evolved through the folk process into one of the most beautiful, remorseful lyric statements in the body of Anglo-American folk song". THE WATER IS WIDE es una canción de Bob Dylan del año 2002, este tema está incluido dentro del disco The Bootleg Series, Vol 5: Bob Dylan Live 1975. Build me a boat that can carry two. This book was published on January 1st, 1726 (see the advert in the Daily Post, December 31, 1725, GDN Z2000268762, BBCN). Read about The Water Is Wide from Bob Dylan & Joan Baez's Duets From the Rolling Thunder Revue: 1975-1976 and see the artwork, lyrics and similar artists. At least it was regularly  republished during the next decades and well into the 19th century. 99, p. 205) have published a version in their collections as have for example also Cecil Sharp (No. It's in no way related to any of the others collected with this song. Ralph Waldo Emerson included the text in his poetry anthology Parnassus (1875, p. 382). 1701, available at NLS: The Word On The Street), another one from this family: Interestingly the first verse here is clearly a variant form of the third in "Oh Waly, Waly" ("O waly, waly, but love be bonnie […]") but this particular version did not survive. 39, pp. It is far more likely that the anonymous creator of this song simply borrowed an older verse. Unfortunately we don't know anything else about this song. It was published on a broadside where it was only called  "A New Love Song". (ESTC, The Unfortunate Swain. This is just a preview! These two songs must have been written at the time of her return. 142. 27, 1923, pp. The verse with the "cockle shells" is missing. Both are about love growing cold with the time and offer a similar message although the new variant sounds a little more drastic. All his song-sheets at the allegro Catalogue are dated that way. It was published on a broadside where it was only called  "A New Love Song". I'm not sure how popular this broadside was, I only know of one English and two Scottish prints. 184/5, notes p. xxxviii). To my knowledge Sharp was the only one. Two years later the Duke of Northumberland offered prizes for the two best collections of "ancient Northumbrian music". Bob Dylan. Two verses were dropped, the first of the longer version  ("Many cold winters nights I've travell'd [...]") and one of the two borrowed from "Oh Waly, Waly" ("I leane'd my backagainst the wall [...]". A Musical Wreath of Scotish Song by John Turnball and Patrick Buchan (Glasgow 1841, p. 54), George F. Graham's The Songs of Scotland (1848, Vol. But at least the wide dissemination of this verse allows the conclusion that it was coined already in England. Another one may have been taken from "Arthur's Seat Shall Be My Bed, or: Love in Despair" (ca. But in this case Mrs. Mogg's second verse - "Love is handsome [...]" must have caught his attention because he recognized it as a variant form of the of the second verse of Ramsay's "O Waly, Waly, Gin Love Be Bonny" and  "its occurence [...] probably led Sharp to believe that the song was really 'O Waly Waly' badly remembered" (Allen, p. 165). Sharp, English Folk Songs from The Southern Appalachians, New York & London 1917 (available at, James Catnach, Catalogue Of Songs And Song Books,Sheets, Half-Sheets, Christmas Carols, Children's Books &c. &c. &c., Printed And Published By J. Catnach, Printer and Publisher,2, Monmouth Court, Seven Dials, 1832 (in: Madden Ballads, Reel 5), Robert Chambers, The Scottish Ballads, Edinburgh 1829 (available at, Francis James Child, The English And Scottish Popular Ballads, Part 7 (i.e. James Oswald included it both in his Curious Collection of Scots Tunes (1740) and in the Caledonian Pocket Companion (Vol. Sir Oliver Records A nice one directly from my harddiscs Thanks to the original uploader and the makers of this beauty. 5, 1797, Vol. "Forsaken Lover. Otherwise all these fragments wouldn't have been found in so many different places. An annotation cannot contain another annotation. It is far more likely that the anonymous creator of this song simply borrowed an older verse. Either Mrs. Cox has created the melody all by herself: the similarities to the songs mentioned above may be purely coincidental or she simply used the same musical motif as the starting-point. Neither have I wings to fly But love grows old an' waxes cold 18-28, Joshua Leavitt, The Christian Lyre, Vol. In 1954 American American Folk singer Susan Reed recorded a short song called "Must I Go Bound" for her 10-inch LP Old Airs From Ireland, Scotland and England (Elektra EKL 26). Folklorists in the USA have found a lot of variants of a song usually called "Fair And Tender Ladies" or "Little Sparrow" (Roud # 451, see f. ex. ), Cecil Sharp's Collection Of English Folk Songs, Vol. It was sent to him – apparently without a text - by "Lady Lethbridge as sung by her old nurse": After the turn of the century the collectors still found more relics of the song. A. Fuller Maitland, English County Songs, London [1893], Lucy E. Broadwood et al.,  1923, Songs of Unhappy Love, in: Journal of the Folk-Song Society, Vol. It's in no way related to any of the others collected with this song. St. Helens is about 25 miles from Manchester and according to the Book Trade Index one Daniel Liptrot was busy there as a printer in 1841. Vulcan's cup. Instead it was a song heard and learned many decades ago and then only recalled for the collectors when they asked for "old songs". The earliest version of the last verse of looks a little bit different from the one used for "The Water Is Wide": According to Robert Chambers (1829, p. 134) "troly, loly" was common as a "burden [...] of songs [...] during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries". In some verses it's aabb, in others abab or abcb and in the last one the first two lines do not rhyme with each other ("end/best"). Interestingly most of the rest of the text is derived from another old broadside called "The Wheels of Fortune" that includes a variant form of one verse known from Ramsay's "Oh Waly, Waly" (Mu23-y1:104 and Mu23-y1:105 at Glasgow Broadside Ballads and Firth c.18(132) in the allegro Catalogue of Ballads, all undated, see also the version in Christie, Vol. This ballad was first printed in a fragmentary version in in 1776 in the second edition of David Herd's Ancient and Modern Scottish Songs (Vol. Two pieces published circa 1780 demonstrate this technique. But at least one verse was already known a hundred years earlier. But in fact he had created it anew by collating bits and pieces from different field-recordings. 487-8, in the edition published in 1839): Another version of this song can be found in the Thomas Hepple Manuscript. This was in fact an abbreviated version of the old "Peggy Gordon" with some minor changes but the three verses can also be traced back to the first edition of the British broadside. Interestingly this particular stanza has occasionally infiltrated other songs: one called "Twenty, Eighteen" from Norfolk that was published in 1893 in Lucy Broadwood's and J. The first volume had come out in 1724 (ESTC N045927). But the new version of the first stanza had not survived, instead Mr. Baker used the one from the latter song: This verse and especially the the expression "the childish part" showed considerable persistence. Pitts' address on this broadside is "6, Great St. Andrew Street, 7 Dials". 2. 81-2). The only differences to the other texts were that one of the original verses was missing and that the lilies took over the main role in the first verse: Four copies of another edition called "The Maid's Complaint" - also with eight instead of nine verses - can be found among the Madden Ballads (8-5377; 9-5914 & 6132; 10-7033). A chapbook called "Nelson's Wreath, Or British Glory" with "A new song on Lord Nelson's victory at Copenhagen" (Curzon b.24(99), all at BBO) is dated as from "1801- 1805". There are some more extant  copies of this song but they were published a little bit later. A modern Folklorist will not regard his song as "authentic" but a professional author of broadside songs from the 18th or 19th century and also the singing "Folk" surely would not have been bothered by his methods. 1, pp. 1, London, New York & Toronto 1974, Ann Keith, 'Most Suitable For Purposes Of Publication': Cecil Sharp's Folk Song Texts, in: Brio, Vol. Another edition was brought out by William Wright from Birmingham (Madden Ballads 11-7422). There is a ship an' she sails on the sea Loaded deep as deep can be But not as deep as the love I'm in And know not how I sink or swim. In this case he would have marked "Oh Waly,Waly" not with a "Z" as an old song but with a "Q, old songs with additions". Neither have I wings to fly It is not unreasonable to assume that these two songs have a common ancestor, perhaps an undocumented Irish version - or predecessor -  of "I'm Often Drunk". So it seems it was already known in Folk Revival circles before it was recorded by Pete Seeger. Dylan later reported that he had "heard a Scottish ballad on an old 78 record that I was trying to really capture the feeling of, that was haunting me [...] It was just a melody (liner notes to Biograph, 1985). Follow @JuergenKloss Apparently only the broadsides served as the conduit for these verses' transmission. But that's of course speculation and at the moment this question can't be answered. 270-2). And on page 4 we can read that it was "printed by permission". Four more prints have survived. This "New Song much in Request" was apparently published circa 1701 (available at, Some verses from "Oh Waly, Waly" can be found in a couple of variants of  "Jamie Douglas" (see, It seems that "Oh Waly, Waly" was immensely popular during the 18th and 19th century. The Water Is Wide Bob Dylan. Sharp used two of his four verses for the extended text published in 1916: A fragment supplied by Mrs. Elizabeth Mogg (1904, Karpeles, No. As noted above Johnson's would be a much more likely candidate for this honor. Another ancient verse from the "The Unfortunate Swain" - later recycled by Sharp for the longer version of his "Waly, Waly" in One Hundred English Folk Songs, 1916, p. 90 - has also taken on a life of its own: It had not been part of the original "Oh Waly, Waly, Gin Love Be Bonny". Variants of the second verse - "Come all ye fair maids, now take a warnin [...]'" - are of course also known from the American song "Fair And Tender Ladies". Two can be found in Martin Parker's "The Distressed Virgin" (first printed 1633, ESTC S112529, available at EEBO; see also Douce Ballads 1(59a), between 1663 and 1674, at BBO; Pepys 3.313, ca. A variant of the second can be found in a manuscript from the 1620s (see Child IV,  No. Variants of the second verse - "Come all ye fair maids, now take a warnin [...]'" - are of course also known from the American song "Fair And Tender Ladies". 18H, p. 110, sung by Mrs Dunagan, St. Helen's, Kentucky, "Deep In Love (Must I Be Bound Or Must I Go Free? A version with a tune and four verses - including variant forms of two we know from the modern "The Water Is Wide" - can be found in William Thomson's, Thomson was a Scottish singer who had moved to London. The text is very similar to the printed versions and one may assume that he had a broadside or a chapbook with that song at hand. But maybe Mr. Walker or Miss Hoare were also readers of Notes & Queries: The second one (text F) with only three badly remembered verses was recorded from William Nichols,Whitchurch, Devon, whose "grandmother sang it to him in 1825": The third fragment (text B) was taken down from "Mary Sacherley [i. e. Sally Satterley], aged 75 [...] daughter of an old singing moor man", a "famous singer on Dartmoor". 204). The Water Is Wide (Live at Boston Music Hall, Boston, MA - November 21, 1975 - Evening ... - Duration: 5:18. Their copyright was acknowledged by Pete Seeger and Oak Publications when they published "The Water Is Wide" in 1960 in the songbook American Favorite Ballads. Here is the text published by W. Armstrong in Liverpool between 1820 and 1824 (, The editor of this particular text even tried to repair the last verse and introduced an appropriate rhyme. They seem to suggest that Sharp had collected the song in exactly this form. Motherwell (p. 407) claims that this ballad was "frequently sung to the same tune as 'Waly, Waly, Up The Bank'" but the one he has included (p. 421; also Bronson III, No. 1166, p. 252, as sung by Alexander Robb, 1906 ("Waly, Waly, Gin Love Be Bonny"), "The Water Is Wide", as sung by Pete Seeger on American Favourite Ballads, Vol. We have even one single version from North America, another fragment of two verses that were recorded by Cecil Sharp from the singing of Jane Gentry in 1916 in North Carolina (Sharp Ms.: Some of the tunes presented here are clearly related to the one published by Johnson in the. William Christie, Traditional Ballad Airs, Vol. The first verse about "the ripest of apples" was most likely developed from or inspired by the verse starting with "If love is handsome [...]" in "I'm Often Drunk", the one borrowed from "Oh Waly, Waly". Most of the informants couldn't remember too much of the original text. II, Edinburgh 1881  (available for download as pdf-files at University of Edinburgh, School of literature, Languages and Cultures, Celtic & Scottish Studies, John Harrington Cox, Folk-Songs Of The South, Cambridge 1925 (available at the, Henry George Farmer, Foreword to Orpheus Caledonius. 290-293, version A & C). 1, p. 260): On the British broadside sheet this song  is combined with "The Green Willow" that includes another variant form of this verse: Some time in the 1940s Jean Ritchie learned a little song from an "Irish girl" (Ritchie, p. 24): She regarded this song as an "enchanting version of 'Waly, Waly'" but in fact it looks more like a fragment of "Love It Is Easin'/Pleasin'/Teasin'" as collected in Britain by Williams, Hammond and Gardiner. Lomax' "Love Is Pleasin'" is not so much a "Folk"-version of "Waly, Waly" but a fragment of the broadside song "The Wheel Of Fortune". But generally it seems to me that this imprint was mostly used during the ‘10s and early '20s. For example there was one with the songs "Rose of Albion" and "God Save The Queen" (Harding B 11(3324)). 204, This particular lines were also used as the fourth verse in a, Of course this doesn't mean that "Oh Waly, Waly" already existed at that time. 2, SBG/3/5/8A, at The Full English). One was by Mrs. Caroline Cox (1905, Karpeles 35A, p. 171; Sharp Ms.: The second one was from James Thomas (1906, Karpeles 35B, p. 172; Sharp Ms.: A fragment supplied by Mrs. Elizabeth Mogg (1904, Karpeles, No. Loaded deep as deep can be. Already in 1803 a fragmentary version consisting of only three verses but including a tune was published by James Johnson in the sixth volume of his, Another version of this song can be found in the Thomas Hepple Manuscript. How did the anonymous writers of broadside ballads produce their texts? It seems that the original "Oh Waly, Waly" was literally broken into pieces by the writers of all those broadsides. In the Notes on the Songs (p.76) a "Mrs. Cox, of High Ham" is mentioned as the source for both the words and the tune. Willie is the Lad for me, [Newcastle upon Tyne?, 1780?] It seems that "Oh Waly, Waly" was immensely popular during the 18th and 19th century. 35 C, p. 173. Folklorists in the USA have found a lot of variants of a song usually called "Fair And Tender Ladies" or "Little Sparrow" (Roud # 451, see f. ex. 3, p. 298). 1650, see ESTC R227870) but only in a rather mutilated form. But this would mean that "Oh Waly,Waly" was not that old because it then must have been written after "Arthur's Seat". "Melody in Common Time", words: "The Happy Land" by Isaac Watts, from Joshua Leavitt, The Christian Lyre, Third Edition, Revised, New York 1831. But at least one verse was already known a hundred years earlier. The first thing to note is that Baring-Gould really had done his homework. Both songs are modern variants of the same ancient broadside ballad with a little input from another old song-sheet. FAVORITE (21 fans) Bob Dylan. "Forsaken Lover. And now we have arrived again at the text I have quoted in the very first chapter: This reduced version looks in fact very close to the original "Oh Waly, Waly": variant forms of two of these four verses – the third and the fourth - had already been part of that old Scottish ballad when it was first published by Thomson and Ramsay in 1726. 2, Folkways FW 02321, 1958, also available in American Favorite Ballads. There it apparently became not only the precursor of "Peggy Gordon" but also one of the sources for the songs of the type "Fair And Tender Ladies/Little Sparrow". He noted that it was "a fragment of a song frequently sung by the Newcastle pitmen". It was also included in many songsters, for example The Lark (1740, 1742), The Merry Companion (1742), The Charmer (1752, 1765),  The Scots Blackbird (1766, 1768), The Blackbird (1771, 1783, p. 91, at Google Books) and  The Diary Maid: Or, Vocal Miscellany (1784; all available at ECCO) and in chapbooks like this one: But the text of "Oh Waly, Waly" also found a place in the most important antiquarian collections of that time: Thomas Percy's Reliques of Ancient English Poetry (1765, here pp. But they also start with the line "Sweet Peggy Gordon, you are my darling". The others - including the two collected by Sharp - are not related to this group and they are also very different from each other. P. 205 ) have published a version of the People, Athens, GA 1990, James in... Ballads 7-4995 ) was sent to him by Miss Octavia L. Hoare, correspondent. London: Ascherberg, Hopwood & Crew, 1935 ( see the British book Index... – who was a rather strange line: `` Oh Waly, ''. 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